Working Together: Group Treatment in Speech Therapy

 

group-1232896_960_720When people think of speech therapy, they usually picture a therapist and patient working together one-on-one. While this kind of therapy certainly has benefits like individual attention and the ability to closely assess a patient’s specific strengths and challenges, including group treatment as a part of speech-language therapy can have enormous benefits too. Continue reading

Posted in speech pathology, speech therapy, speech-language pathology, speech-language therapy, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Reading Trouble? A Speech-Language Pathologist Can Help!

Language learning disorders can cause academic problems. Speech therapy can help!A couple of weeks ago, we talked about ways you can work with your child at home to prepare them to learn to read. Developing pre-literacy skills with your child can go a long way towards improving reading skills down the road, but many children still need a little extra help when the time comes. For children that have trouble learning to read, a speech-language pathologist can be a valuable member of the team. A recent survey found that over 70% of teachers believed that students who received speech therapy services demonstrated improved reading skills in the classroom (ASHA, National Outcome Measurement System). In many cases, speech-language pathologists can identify the root of a reading or writing issue through the child’s difficulty with language, and help the child remediate or compensate for the difficulties. Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized, Learning Disorders, speech language therapy, speech pathology, literacy | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

What Is A Cleft And How Does It Affect Communication?

JulyAwareness_IconOnlyDid you know that 4,437 children are born with a cleft lip and/or cleft palate in the United States every year? Each July organizations across the country raise public awareness of cleft and other craniofacial disorders with National Cleft and Craniofacial Awareness and Prevention Month. In support of this campaign, we’re dedicating this week’s blog to providing some basic information about what clefts are and how they impact communication. Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized, speech language therapy, speech-language pathology, speech pathology, speech-language therapy | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Give Your Child a Head Start! How to Prepare your Child to Read

What is Dyslexia?Learning to read is one of the most important skills a child learns in school. Now more than ever, children are being transitioned from “learning to read” to “reading to learn” earlier and earlier in their academic life. Unfortunately, learning to read is a complicated skill that doesn’t come easily to many children, and falling behind on literacy can quickly lead to falling behind in school in general. However there are experiences you can provide for your child at home that can help them develop critical skills which will help them to learn to read more easily when the time comes. How can you help your child get on the right track? Take a look at these tips for developing early literacy skills: Continue reading

Posted in speech pathology, speech therapy, speech-language pathology, speech-language therapy, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Summer Learning Loss: Don’t Let Your Child Be a Victim of the Summer Slide!

Summer vacation has arrived! As schools let out across the country, kids everywhere are looking forward to the upcoming months of freedom and fun. Unfortunately, this much deserved break can also come with a downside: the Summer Slide. The Summer Slide (aka summer learning loss) is a phenomenon where students lose a significant portion of the skills they learned over the summer. The Summer Slide has been repeatedly documented by students presenting with lower test scores following summer break. Summer learning loss can be a significant problem for all children, but the burden can be even more difficult for children with learning deficits. What can you do to make sure your child doesn’t get left behind over the summer and is ready to hit the ground running come September? Continue reading

Posted in speech therapy, speech-language pathology, speech-language therapy, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How Does a Speech-Language Pathologist Help a Person with Aphasia?

 

Jayne LatzDid you know that aphasia affects about two million Americans, is more common than Parkinson’s Disease, cerebral palsy or muscular dystrophy, and yet, most people have never heard of it? Aphasia is a communication disorder that occurs after a stroke or other neurological injury that makes it difficult to communicate using language. Each June, organizations around the country participate in Aphasia Awareness Month, a campaign designed to raise public awareness of aphasia. Continue reading

Posted in speech pathology, speech therapy, speech-language pathology, speech-language therapy | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Aphasia ID Cards: Improving Understanding and Increasing Awareness

TBIDid you know that June is Aphasia Awareness Month? Aphasia is a communication disorder that makes it difficult to communicate with language. Aphasia occurs after a neurological injury (often a stroke) and affects approximately 180,000 people in the United States every year! Aphasia can impact any aspect of language—speaking, listening, reading or writing—but does not impact a person’s level  of intelligence. Unfortunately, many people aren’t aware of what aphasia is or don’t recognize it when they meet someone who has the condition. This means that there are often misunderstandings in which people assume a person with aphasia is intellectually impaired. This can be extremely frustrating for the person with aphasia and can make communication even more difficult. Continue reading

Posted in speech pathology, speech therapy, speech-language pathology, speech-language therapy, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment