Senior Moment or Mild Cognitive Impairment?

DysphagiaDrawing a blank when trying to remember the name of a familiar colleague. Misplacing your keys in the oddest of places. Having a standing appointment slip your mind. If you’re like most older adults, you have plenty of stories of “senior moments.” While these little lapses in memory are a far cry from full-blown dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, in some cases they might be a sign of a different problem: mild cognitive impairment (MCI).  Continue reading

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Is My Child on Track? Milestones for the First Year

Every parent eagerly awaits for their child’s first words. Waiting for your child to find their voice (and maybe catch that first “mama” or “dada” on camera!) is an exciting time for any parent. However, your child starts developing their communication skills long before that first word appears. Communication skills developed in the first year of life are essential to speech and language development.

Each child develops according to his or her own timeline, but there are some general milestones you can keep an eye out for to make sure your child is on track.

Birth to 3 months

  • Understanding: In response to different sounds, a child might startle, change their sucking pattern when feeding, and quiet down or smile when spoken to
  • Speaking: Your child should be making pleasure sounds (like cooing), and is likely using different cries for different needs.

4-6 months

  • Understanding: Looks in the direction of sounds, focuses on toys that make sound or music, responds to changes in your tone of voice.
  • Speaking: Begins to babble (using sounds like p, b, and m), gurgle and laugh. Vocalizes when excited or upset.

7 months to one year

  • Understanding: Focuses on you and listens when you speak. Recognizes basic, common words like “milk” or “ball”. Responds to simple, one-step directions and questions like, “come here” or “want more?”.
  • Speaking: Babbling becomes more varied and complicated, and uses vocalizations to get attention. Uses non-verbal communication (waving, holding arms up to be picked up). Around one year, begins to produce simple, single words.

Want to learn more? Take a look at the following video from Speech Associates of NY founder and president, Jayne Latz:

 

 

If you have any questions or would like to know more about speech-language therapy, give us a call at (212) 308-7725 or send an e-mail to jayne@speechassociatesofny.com. I’d be happy to chat and answer any questions you may have.

© 2016, Speech Associates of New York – All Rights Reserved

Sources: http://www.asha.org/public/speech/development/01/

 

 

 

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Five Signs Your Child Could Have Non-Verbal Learning Disorder

13_46Did you know that 2.4 million American public school students have been identified as having a learning disability? That’s approximately five percent of students! Being identified as having a learning disorder is important; once a challenge is identified, a student can receive support that helps them achieve their greatest academic potential. Unfortunately, some learning disabilities are difficult to spot, and allow many kids to slip through the cracks and not receive the help they need. One learning disability that is notoriously difficult to spot is non-verbal learning disorder (NLD or NVLD). Continue reading

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Foreign Accent Syndrome: When Your Voice Isn’t Your Own

Flag-map_of_the_world.svgForeign Accent Syndrome: When Your Voice Isn’t Your Own
by Debbie Waldman

For many people, having a foreign or regional accent is an important part of their identity. But what if that accent wasn’t your own? This is the case for people who have been diagnosed with foreign accent syndrome (FAS). Continue reading

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Working Together: Group Treatment in Speech Therapy

 

group-1232896_960_720When people think of speech therapy, they usually picture a therapist and patient working together one-on-one. While this kind of therapy certainly has benefits like individual attention and the ability to closely assess a patient’s specific strengths and challenges, including group treatment as a part of speech-language therapy can have enormous benefits too. Continue reading

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Reading Trouble? A Speech-Language Pathologist Can Help!

Language learning disorders can cause academic problems. Speech therapy can help!A couple of weeks ago, we talked about ways you can work with your child at home to prepare them to learn to read. Developing pre-literacy skills with your child can go a long way towards improving reading skills down the road, but many children still need a little extra help when the time comes. For children that have trouble learning to read, a speech-language pathologist can be a valuable member of the team. A recent survey found that over 70% of teachers believed that students who received speech therapy services demonstrated improved reading skills in the classroom (ASHA, National Outcome Measurement System). In many cases, speech-language pathologists can identify the root of a reading or writing issue through the child’s difficulty with language, and help the child remediate or compensate for the difficulties. Continue reading

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What Is A Cleft And How Does It Affect Communication?

JulyAwareness_IconOnlyDid you know that 4,437 children are born with a cleft lip and/or cleft palate in the United States every year? Each July organizations across the country raise public awareness of cleft and other craniofacial disorders with National Cleft and Craniofacial Awareness and Prevention Month. In support of this campaign, we’re dedicating this week’s blog to providing some basic information about what clefts are and how they impact communication. Continue reading

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