Monthly Archives: September 2012

Early Childhood Communication: Adult Language

Last week we spoke a bit about the characteristics of child-directed speech or “baby talk”. This type of speech is often used by adults with infants and has specific characteristics that make it a recognizable speech pattern. Today, we’ll talk … Continue reading

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Early Childhood Communication: Baby Talk

Over the past few weeks we’ve discussed different aspects of how a child develops language, from early non-verbal communication through the two-word phase of language. In today’s blog, we’ll shift gears a bit, focusing on the care-giver’s communicative role in … Continue reading

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Early Childhood Communication: The Two-Word Stage

Last week, we discussed the point in child-language development where the child begins to combine two words to create short, but meaningful sentences. Psychologist Roger Brown identified the unique grammar combinations that can be found during this phase, shedding light … Continue reading

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Early Childhood Communication: The Two-Word Stage

Over the past several blogs we’ve followed the course of child communication development, from early squeals and grunts through that long-awaited first word. Today, we’ll talk about the next significant phase of child language development: the two-word stage. Usually at

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