How Can You Help a Child with Cleft Palate?

SmileTrainDid you know that September is National Craniofacial Acceptance Month? This campaign is designed to raise awareness about cleft palate, a condition in which a child is born with an opening in the boney part of the roof of their mouth, often extending through the lip and sometimes to the base of the nostrils. Last week we talked about what a cleft palate is and how it can affect a child’s speech and language development. In the United States, most children who are born with a cleft surgery in early childhood and with speech and language therapy, go on to live completely normal lives. However, in developing countries, a lack of finances and access to medical care often means a child with a cleft may be unable to receive the surgery they need. This can leave the child with life-long health and communication issues.

If you want to help a child with a cleft palate, check out www.smiletrain.org. Smile Train is a charity which provides free cleft palate surgeries to children in developing countries. This year alone, Smile Train is projected to provide over 125,000 free surgeries to children in need. The organization also has an eye on long-term sustainability, training and utilizing local hospitals to help provide them with the skills and resources necessary to continue to help children with cleft palate.  If you’re interested in donating, visit the Smile Train website. Just two hundred and fifty dollars covers an entire surgery for one child with cleft palate; however, you can donate as much or as little as you’d like. Check it out today, and find out how you can make a difference.

For information on our New York based Speech-Language Pathology services, please call Speech Associates of New York today at (212) 308-7725 or visit our website at http://www.speechassociatesofny.com and find out how our team of professionally trained and certified speech-language pathologists can help!

© 2013, Speech Associates of New York – All Rights Reserved

Advertisements
This entry was posted in cleft lip, cleft palate and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s