Keeping Your Voice Young

Keeping your voice youngWrinkles, greying hair, continually forgetting just where you left those car keys: just a few of the gifts Father Time likes to pass out as we wrack up our birthdays. While many people are preoccupied with looking young, increasingly people have taken an interest in sounding young as well. The desire to maintain a robust, commanding voice often leads people to seek out the assistance of a speech-language pathologist or vocal coach to help rehabilitate an aging voice.

As we age, all of our muscles tend to weaken. This includes the muscles associated with producing the voice, as well as the vocal chords themselves. Over time, this can cause something known as presbylaryngis, or a loss of vocal quality or strength due to aging. When we produce sound, our vocal folds come together and vibrate. As the vocal chords age, they often thin and weaken, and no longer come together as tightly. This often results in a weak, thin, reedy voice. It also requires the person to use more effort as they speak.

A recent article in AARP discussed how an increasing number of older individuals are choosing to seek voice therapy to address the ravages of aging on the voice. Vocal therapy with a speech-language pathologist can help improve vocal quality and strength, making the voice easier to hear and essentially, “sound younger”. The speech therapist will help to improve breathing techniques to better support the voice and increase volume. In addition, they can provide vocal exercises to strengthen muscles, reduce tension, and increase the closure of the vocal chords.

For information on our New York based Speech-Language Pathology services, please call Speech Associates of New York today at (212)308-7725 or visit our website at http://www.speechassociatesofny.com and find out how our team of professionally trained and certified speech-language pathologists can help!

© 2013, Speech Associates of New York – All Rights Reserved

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