Communication through the Lifespan

13_50As modern medicine continually finds ways to extend the length and quality of life, the number of senior citizens in the United States has increased significantly. Unfortunately, aging often brings difficulties in speech, language and communication. While age-related communication disorders can’t be prevented entirely, the services of a speech-language pathologist can help. What are some of the senior communication problems many face as they age?

  • Dementia: Dementia is a common problem for aging seniors. Dementia doesn’t just affect a person’s memory—it can also create significant problems in understanding and producing language. A speech-language pathologist can work with the individual and their family to provide strategies to maintain meaningful communication for as long as possible, and increase language use.
  • Stroke: The likelihood of stroke increases with age. Impairments in both speech and language are some of the most common deficits following a stroke. Speech-language pathologists can work with a patient immediately after a stroke to increase communication improvement as the brain heals, as well as provide strategies for improved communication even years after a stroke has occurred. 
  • Swallowing Difficulties: Problems with swallowing can result from a number of age-related conditions, including neurological diseases like Parkinson’s, brain damage resulting from a stroke, or dementia. A speech-language pathologist can work with a person with swallowing issues to increase safety while eating and drinking, and provide recommendations for diet modification.

For information on our New York Speech-Language Pathology services, please call Speech Associates of New York today at (212) 308-7725 or visit our website at http://www.speechassociatesofny.com and find out how our team of professionally trained and certified speech-language pathologists can help!

© 2013, Speech Associates of New York – All Rights Reserved

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